Mein Neevi, mera murshid uccha,
O’ mein Neevi, mera murshid uccha,
Sadke javaan unha, ucchiyaa de,
Jina neeviya naal nibhayaan, O’ miya!

What a fantastic Urdu verse with a deep meaning!

Mein Neevi, mera murshid uccha,

The poet considers himself one of the worst persons full of mistakes, full of ego by the words “Mein Neevi.” He finds his Murshid (read: God) much better than him, worthy of praises and dedicated to mankind.

Sadke javaan unha, ucchiyaa de,

The sishya (read: poet) is so enthralled by the beauty of his Murshid, whom he considers to be much more higher than him, that he is ready to give away his life for the love of his Murshid.

Jina neeviya naal nibhayaan, O’ miya!

He further describes the reason for his love: Even after being at such a high position, his Murshid keeps a relationship with a person like him (full of ego, faults.)

The deeper meaning:

One’s status is not depicted by the wealth he has acrued over period of time, the knowledge that he has gathered by reading books, not even by the society in which he lives. The status of person is figured by how he behaves with people, who are less virtuous to him in any respect. Blessed is a person, who keeps equal relationships with both the higher and the lower class of the society.

This remindes me of another verse written by Rahim (one of the Krishna’s disciples):

Rahiman badaan ko dekh kar, Laghu na dejee daal,
Jahan kaam aaye sui, Kya kare talvaar.

This short and sweet example by a saint explains the above lines again. By being into the upper class of the society, do not feel proud, do not annul your relationships with the lower class because you never know when you may need the help of a lower class person. Hence, nobody should be tagged as ‘higher’, ‘upper’ or ‘lower’ by his/her status, work or religion. Everyone is equal and our behaviour should remain unbiased towards all – without the letter ‘I’ (read: Ego) coming into picture.